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in the united states die from choking. but as courtney reports, with a little bit of knowledge, you might be able to save a life. >> doctors, paramedics, lifeguards - they're all trained to save lives. but they're not always going to be around when you need them. that's why it's important to learn life-saving techniques that you can use at home, school or just hanging out with friends. >> alex, do you know what to do if someone is choking? >> well, i know you're supposed to use the heimlich maneuver but i don't know how to do it. >> me neither. so we went to find an expert to show us how to do it, and guess what? we found the expert -- dr. heimlich, himself. the man who invented the heimlich maneuver. he's going to show us the correct way to do it. hi, dr. heimlich. >> hi, courtney. >> so, what do we do first? >> stand up. this is one way to do it, standing up. it's the most common way, okay? what you're going to do is you're going to put you're your arms around, you're going to feel for the bottom of the ribcage with your hand here. so you're always below that ribcage. you're going to ma
have a number of units from inside state police. most folks are familiar with state troopers that patrol highways. but the state police is much larger than that. we have a large marine services bureau, aviation assets, canines, bomb technicians. we also have a watch operation center in the rock. and the job of the watch operation center is to actually dispatch, whether it's helicopters, whether it's boats, hether it's troopers, to do specific missions, responding to accidents, searching for a child who's lost in the woods, it's those types of missions that are going on all day long, actually 24 hours a day, seven days a week. >> director kelly agreed to give us an exclusive tour of the rock. >> kris, what we have here, where we're starting in the building, is really a public area of the building, outside of the secure operational side of the building. this is what we call our media room. >> this room is impressive. but it was really an honor, when director kelly invited teen kids news to come inside an area not usually open to the general media. we got a rare look behind the
. but the united states didn't get involved until two years later, when japan sneak-attacked our navy at pearl harbor. it took four long years before the allies finally won. the national world war ii memorial is a tribute to the heroism of that time. it's a memorial on a scale that matches america's massive commitment. 16 million men and women served in our military during wwii. it's located right at the heart of the national mall, between the washington monument and the lincoln memorial. however, the memorial didn't open until 2004 - almost 60 years after the war ended. vietnam and korea both had monuments earlier, even though those wars were fought after world war ii. >> why wasn't there a wwii memorial earlier? that was a generation who said "i'm just doing my job. i don't need any commemoration in essence for just doing my job." >> the memorial has many parts. at the center, there's a pool with a huge fountain. the architects wanted this to be a joyful symbol of the allies' victory. it's also useful for cooling off overheated tourists. around the pool are 56 pillars. they represent each of
the camaraderie. meeting different people from all around the united states was the best thing. you know, i've made new friends. some live in wisconsin, to kansas and california. so now we're going to do the whole facebook thing and keep in contact with each other. >> it's a really good program for students because it does give you a chance to see what west point's all about if you're considering coming here. if you're interested, it's a great chance to get your feet on the ground and see if it's something that you are meant for. >> they spend a lot of time and work to make this a good experience for us, so i really enjoyed it, and it was a big challenge, but i had fun. >> i think this is really the right place for me. it's really where i want to go. it's just helped me make my decision about my college. >> my ultimate goal is to be an army officer, and just by basically knowing the history of west point and all those who've come through here and established a name for themselves in the military and around the world, i think it will be the best route, the best way to become an army officer.
'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm jessica. >>> the number of teen pregnancies in the united states is up. for the first time in 15 years, more girls are getting pregnant and having to make some tough choices. felipe has more on this story. >> we talked to some teen moms and teen health experts. they agree more needs to be done by teens and adults to stop this growing problem. dayleen is all smiles when she looks at her 8-month-old daughter, jada. but when she looks back on sophomore year in high school, the year she got pregnant, she remembers this was not in her plans. >> i should have been more careful. i was planning to have a baby when i was older, like finish school, go to college, settle down and have a baby. >> how many pounds did she weigh? >> crystal is 18 and pregnant for the second time. she was 15 when her first pregnancy ended in month 7. she lost her baby. >> i wasn't taking care of myself at all. i would not go to the doctor. i wouldn't -- not even, like, go to the gyn. like, i wouldn't do none of that type of stuff and i would just do my life, just live. >> pregnant teens are less likel
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5